Tuesday, September 24, 2013

FOODS TO HELP YOU LIVE LONGER...YE KEW..??

The foods 100-year-olds claim are the secret to living to a ripe old age.


Korang enjoy la dengan bacaan pemakanan ni ek..
Pencinta makanan ( tq pd Adik Sha Pa kastam yg menggelarkan akk nink ni )

Minestrone (© ASSOCIATED PRESS)

The world’s oldest siblings - the nine Melis siblings of Sardinia, who boast a combined age of nearly 820 - recently revealed the secret of their incredible longevity.
It is down, said 100-year-old Claudina, to hard work, being surrounded by family (the nine boast 150 children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren between them) and minestrone soup.
“You just keep working and you eat minestrone, beans and potatoes,” said the sprightly centurion.
And she’s not the first record-breaking pensioner to attribute great age to great food (and drink). Here are the foods the oldest people in the world eat, and why it might contribute to their long and active lives.

Minestrone (© ASSOCIATED PRESS)

The oldest man ever to have lived died in June at the grand old age of 116. Jiroemon Kimura was born when Queen Victoria was on the British throne and lived through the reigns of four Japanese emperors.
Kimura was the oldest person on the planet when he died, and the oldest man ever to have lived. He put his great age down to waking early, reading the newspaper and eating rice porridge and miso soup.
Genetics helped Kimura live so long (he was from a long living family) but diet may have played a part. Miso soup is an excellent source of dietary fibre and protein, as well as a good source of minerals. It’s also high in vitamin K. But miso is rarely eaten by itself. Common additives like tofu, vegetables and fish stock add a further nutritional punch.

Minestrone (© ASSOCIATED PRESS)

When Kimura died the title of the world’s oldest living person passed to fellow Japanese national Misao Okawa, a 115-year-old Osaka woman who already held the title of the world's oldest living woman. Okawa says she’s not fussy when it comes to food but has a particular fondness for pickled mackerel.
Mackerel is an oily fish and packed with heart-healthy omega-3s and the antioxidant mineral selenium. But as Okawa is not a fussy eater, the Japanese diet as a whole may have played a part in her long life. The traditional Japanese diet includes plenty of pulses, vegetables, fresh fish and seaweed, and smaller portions - compared with what we are used to in the west - are very much the norm.

Minestrone (© ASSOCIATED PRESS)

When Jiroemon Kimura became the world’s oldest living person last year, he took over from Dina Manfredini, an Italian American living in Iowa. Manfredini passed away at the grand old age of 115.
For most of her life she had been a homemaker, and her granddaughter said she was a great cook who loved to feed the family well. In particular, she baked her own bread every Sunday and always made fresh pasta by hand.
Most nutritionists these days would give bread and pasta - made from heavily processed white flour - the thumbs down. But Manfredini’s efforts show a thoroughness with food that will have stood her and her family in good stead.
You can't imagine they ate too many takeaways or ready meals. Fresh home cooked meals were the order of the day. And you can bet that her bread and pasta came with fresh tomato sauces, vegetables and salads. Inadvertently, and by doing what she was brought up in Italy to do, Manfredini may have been proving the health benefits of fresh, home cooking.

Minestrone (© ASSOCIATED PRESS)

The oldest documented person ever to have lived was Jeanne Calment, who died in 1997 at the age of 122 in Arles, France.
Most of us know olive oil is healthy, and Calment would pour it onto all her food and even rub it into her skin, a habit she considered responsible for her youthful good looks (at the age of 110 or so).
But Calment also lived life to the full, and part of that was enjoying wine and chocolate every day. These may seem like vices, but in moderation - and if the wine was red and the chocolate dark - both can actually be good for you. Red wine and dark chocolate are often considered heart healthy treats.

WINE IGNORE KAN LEEE..CHOC AKK SUKEE LER..

Minestrone (© ASSOCIATED PRESS)

Neither bacon nor ice cream - nor for that matter fried chicken - are considered a heart healthy treat. If you asked a nutritionist for a diet to help you live to 100 and beyond it’s a fair bet that none of them would be on it.
But that’s what American Gertrude Baines ate, and she died in 2009 at the age of 115. In fact, days before her death the main thing she was complaining about was soggy bacon.
Still, let’s not assume bacon, fried chicken and ice cream are a long life diet. Baines’ incredible longevity - she was the daughter of slaves - was probably down to good genes and a love of life (though maybe bacon, chicken and ice cream can help with the latter).

Minestrone (© ASSOCIATED PRESS)

The diet of Edna Parker, a former Indiana schoolteacher who was certified as the world's oldest person until her death - aged 115 - in 2008, would also have had nutritionists shaking their heads in disgust.
According to reports, Parker especially enjoyed eggs, sausage, bacon and fried chicken.
Perhaps some people can get away with high fat diets if they work hard. As a farmer's wife Parker rose at 4am every day. At 100, she was still living on the family farm, alone, and still climbing ladders.

Minestrone (© ASSOCIATED PRESS)

Now that’s more like a long-life diet. American Walter Breuning, who in 2009 was the world’s oldest man, put much of his great age down to diet. He ate eggs or toast for breakfast and lots of fruit every day, all washed down with a couple of cups of coffee.
But Breuning had another dietary tip that may have contributed to his longevity. He only ate two meals a day, breakfast and lunch, and said he never felt better after giving up his evening meal. Being hungry was good for you, he claimed, saying that: “I think you should push back from the table when you're still hungry...if you could just tell people not to eat so darn much.”
There’s now quite a lot of evidence that Breuning’s calorie restricted diet can add years to your life.

Minestrone (© ASSOCIATED PRESS)

Portuguese woman Maria de Jesus was officially the oldest person alive for 37 days in 2009, taking over the title from Edna Parker. But unlike Parker, de Jesus’ longevity may have had something to do with her modest diet.
According to reports, de Jesus never drank alcohol or coffee and ate very little meat. Instead, she lived almost entirely on fish and vegetables, making her the poster girl for the benefits of a healthy Mediterranean diet.

Minestrone (© ASSOCIATED PRESS)

Dairy is a bit of a dietary baddie these days, but MarĂ­a Capovilla of Ecuador consumed plenty of it and she was nearly 117 when she died in 2006, putting her fifth in the official all time list of the longest living people. At 116 she was still lunching with her family, enjoying chicken and lentils washed down with a cup of wine, while at night she had coffee with hot milk and bread with cheese or jam.
And proving that a little of what you fancy can do you good, Capovilla said that she couldn't do without something sweet: be it ice cream or cake. In her youth, she would regularly drink fresh donkey and cow milk.



1 comment:

norey said...

wahhhh......mengujiii betul gambar makanan...terasa lapar je...